October 20, 2014

Sleater-Kinney (feat. Miranda July) “Bury Our Friends”

So, here’s a new Sleater-Kinney single, from their January 2015 record, and they’re going to be touring.

Pretty exciting stuff.

(Source: youtube.com)

October 20, 2014

youngermorebeautifulqueen:

game of how disappointed will i be with season five 

October 20, 2014
"

So, my original goal was to portray a society that genuinely did not care about gender. Using a single pronoun for everyone was just one part of that, but the more I played with it, the more interesting the effect was. Ultimately, of course, using “she” for everyone doesn’t actually convey gender neutrality, and I realized that pretty quickly. But I think if I’d chosen to use a gender neutral pronoun—e, or sie, or zie, or any of the others—it would have produced an interesting effect, but it would have lost the way that “she” automatically goes straight to the reader’s perceptions. No, that’s not the best way to say it. I mean, the very long familiarity long-time English speakers have with the pronouns “he” and “she” means that we react to them without actually thinking much about it. We don’t stop to ask ourselves what they mean, they just go right in and trigger a particular set of associations, almost automatically, unconsciously. By using “she” for everyone, I get (for many, but of course not all readers) the effect, once those associations are triggered, of undermining or questioning them, in a very basic way, a sort of… experiential way. It’s one thing to tell someone about the masculine default, and have them understand the idea. It’s another thing to actually demonstrate how it works on your reader. But it only works (for the readers it worked for, because of course it didn’t work for everyone) because we parse those pronouns so thoughtlessly.

The various gender neutral pronouns don’t have that long familiarity for most of us. The effect I mention above, which quite a few readers have explicitly commented on and appreciated, would have been lost if I’d used one of them. It was a trade-off, I think. I can’t blame folks who wish I’d used a gender neutral pronoun instead, of course, and I’m hoping to see those pronouns used more so that they become more generally familiar. I’m seeing singular “they” for known people (instead of the nebulous “don’t know who this might actually be” use of singular they) used well in short fiction lately, and I’ve been really happy to see it. But myself, for this particular project, I think the effect that I got, at least with a sizable number of readers, was worth the trade-off.

So, in some ways I succeeded. In other ways I didn’t. But the result was interesting and gave a lot of people something to think about and discuss, and I’m glad of that.

"

Ann Leckie on the use of “she” in Ancillary Justice and Ancillary Sword

October 20, 2014
Jane the Virgin

FINALLY, a new show to love. Just finished watching the pilot, and it is delightful. If you haven’t watched it yet, I recommend doing so immediately.

October 15, 2014
"

I now believe the most dangerous time for a woman with online visibility is the point at which others are seen to be listening, “following”, “liking”, “favoriting”, retweeting. In other words, the point at which her readers have (in the troll’s mind) “drunk the Koolaid”. Apparently, that just can’t be allowed.

From the hater’s POV, you (the Koolaid server) do not “deserve” that attention. You are “stealing” an audience. From their angry, frustrated point of view, the idea that others listen to you is insanity. From their emotion-fueled view you don’t have readers you have cult followers. That just can’t be allowed.

You must be stopped. And if they cannot stop you, they can at least ruin your quality of life. A standard goal, in troll culture, I soon learned, is to cause “personal ruin”. They aren’t all trolls, though. Some of those who seek to stop and/or ruin you are misguided/misinformed but well-intended. They actually believe in a cause, and they believe you (or rather the Koolaid you’re serving) threatens that cause.

"

Trouble at the Koolaid Point — Serious Pony

October 14, 2014
xkcd: The Sake of Argument

xkcd: The Sake of Argument

October 14, 2014
"Walmart makes $13,000 in pre-tax profits per employee (after paying salaries), yet takes a taxpayer subsidy of $5,815 per worker."

How 14 People Made More Money Than the Entire Food Stamp Budget for 50 Million People (via azspot)

(via azspot)

October 14, 2014
"Toxic masculinity hurts men, but there’s a big difference between women dealing with the constant threat of being raped, beaten, and killed by the men in their lives, and men not being able to cry."

— Robert Jensen  (via internetexplorers)

(Source: jezebeler, via boobytrapzap)

October 14, 2014
The view from my balcony is pretty this time of year.

The view from my balcony is pretty this time of year.

October 13, 2014
Gaiman’s new children’s book, The Sleeper and the Spindle, out on October 23rd, is “a thrillingly reimagined fairy tale” which weaves together “a soft-of Snow White and an almost Sleepy Beauty with a thread of dark magic.” Illustrated by Chris Riddell, the book follows a young queen who sets out to rescue a princess from an enchantment. Neil Gaiman’s New Children’s Book Features Snow White Saving Sleeping Beauty (Feat. Smoochin’) | The Mary Sue

Gaiman’s new children’s book, The Sleeper and the Spindle, out on October 23rd, is “a thrillingly reimagined fairy tale” which weaves together “a soft-of Snow White and an almost Sleepy Beauty with a thread of dark magic.” Illustrated by Chris Riddell, the book follows a young queen who sets out to rescue a princess from an enchantment.
Neil Gaiman’s New Children’s Book Features Snow White Saving Sleeping Beauty (Feat. Smoochin’) | The Mary Sue

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